Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Research: Habitat use by juvenile salmon, other migratory fish, and resident fish species underscores the importance of estuarine habitat mosaics

Pacific salmon, especially Chinook and Chum, reside and feed in estuaries during downstream migrations. But the extent to which they rely on estuaries, and which habitats within estuaries, is not well understood. We need to understand this complexity if we …

Research: Habitat use by juvenile salmon, other migratory fish, and resident fish species underscores the importance of estuarine habitat mosaics Read more »

One night only – Patagonia’s Artifishal screening at the University of Victoria

Join us on Tuesday, August 27, at 7:00 pm for a film screening of Patagonia’s documentary, Artifishal, at the University of Victoria’s Cinecenta theatre located in the Student Union Building. Artifishal examines the harmful effects hatcheries and fish farms have …

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Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales

In both British Columbia and Washington state, fishery managers, provincial and state legislators, the sports fishing lobby, and even the whale watching industry have advocated for increased production of hatchery Chinook to “save” the critically endangered Southern Resident killer whales. …

Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales Read more »

Interview: Why our latest court challenge to the re-approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline is critical for the Salish Sea

The Southern Resident killer whales are a small declining population. The increase in tanker traffic associated with the Trans Mountain expansion will have a significant adverse effect on these killer whales in the Salish Sea. Even the National Energy Board …

Interview: Why our latest court challenge to the re-approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline is critical for the Salish Sea Read more »

Saving endangered whales: Strategies from above and below the 49th parallel

On May 10, the Canadian federal government announced its first wide-ranging measures to reduce the primary threats compromising survival of the salmon-eating Southern Resident killer whales reliant on the transboundary waters of the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia. Although federally …

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Approval of Trans Mountain expansion puts Fraser River salmon and Salish Sea estuaries at risk

The Fraser River in British Columbia remains one of the world’s most productive salmon rivers. Equally significant is the Fraser River’s estuary, which serves as vital habitat for fish, bird, and mammal species that are linked across thousands of kilometers …

Approval of Trans Mountain expansion puts Fraser River salmon and Salish Sea estuaries at risk Read more »

Misty MacDuffee on CFAX 1070 talking about the approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline

The day after the federal government approved the Trans Mountain Pipeline yet again, Raincoast’s Wild Salmon Program Director, Misty MacDuffee spoke with Mark Brennae on CFAX1070 to talk pipelines, whales, and how humans are implicated in the disappearance of species. …

Misty MacDuffee on CFAX 1070 talking about the approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline Read more »

The Fraser River estuary is fragmented by structures that alter the flow of water

Just weeks after construction on the Steveston Jetty, dozens of young chinook and chum salmon were funnelled into our research nets in the Fraser estuary. It’s unusual to have such immediate results on a restoration project, and we were delighted. …

The Fraser River estuary is fragmented by structures that alter the flow of water Read more »